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This meeting took place in 2007



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Tissue Engineering and Development Biology (D4)


Organizer(s) Gordana V. Vunjak-Novakovic, Randall T. Moon and David Kaplan
April 12—17, 2007
Snowbird Resort • Snowbird, UT USA
Abstract Deadline: Dec 12, 2006
Late Abstract Deadline: Jan 16, 2007
Scholarship Deadline: Dec 12, 2006
Early Registration Deadline: Feb 12, 2007

Supported by the Director's Fund

Summary of Meeting:
Our overall goal is to identify the scientific and technological needs that are common for the fields of developmental biology and tissue engineering and thereby help guide the scientific inquiry in the two fields. We believe that the proposed Keystone conference is essential to start ‘filling the gap’ between fundamental concepts in biology and engineering. It is becoming essential to utilize the knowledge base from developmental biology to guide the design of tissue engineering systems, as well as to utilize engineered tissues as controllable biological models for studies of development, remodeling and disease. In a more general sense, we feel that this is the right time to step back and critically rethink the field of tissue engineering, and to establish more efficient interactions between the biologists and engineers. In composing the scientific program, we attempted to identify those individuals who are not only involved in cutting edge research in developmental biology or engineering, but who also work at least in part at the interface between the two disciplines. Also, we selected one unifying theme for each of the four days, and designed the two sessions (morning and evening) such that each theme is addressed from the standpoints of biology and engineering. In addition, we propose two workshops that will also help integrate the approaches: one focused on what developmental biology can offer to tissue engineering (e.g., sound biological principles), and the other focused on what tissue engineering can offer to developmental biology (e.g., advanced tools for in vitro studies). Lastly, the three of us were inspired to propose this conference after a wonderful experience we had at the recent NIH-sponsored workshop that gathered leading tissue engineers and a few developmental biologists. We felt that this is the time for an interactive and inspiring meeting of “biology and engineering”.

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No registration fees are used to fund entertainment or alcohol at this conference

Conference Program    Print  |   View meeting in 24 hr (international) time


THURSDAY, APRIL 12

3:00—7:30 PM
Registration

Ballroom Lobby
6:30—7:30 PM
Refreshments

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
7:30—7:45 PM
Welcome Address

Ballroom 2-3
Gordana V. Vunjak-Novakovic, Columbia University, USA

Randall T. Moon, University of Washington School of Medicine, USA

David L. Kaplan, Tufts University, USA

7:45—8:45 PM
Keynote Address

Ballroom 2-3
Robert M. Nerem, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Tissue Engineering and Developmental Biology: If Every Scar Tells a Story, Salamanders Have No Tales


FRIDAY, APRIL 13

7:00—8:00 AM
Breakfast

Golden Cliff
8:00—11:00 AM
Development and Signaling

Ballroom 2-3
* Suzanne Eaton, Max Planck Institute, Germany

Alexander F. Schier, Harvard University, USA
MicroRNAs in Vertebrate Embryogenesis

* Didier Stainier, Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research, Germany
Endodermal Organ Development

Randall T. Moon, University of Washington School of Medicine, USA
Wnt Signaling in Regeneration

Gregg Duester, Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, USA
Short Talk: Retinoic Acid Regulation of Primitive Streak FGF Activity

Anand R. Asthagiri, California Institute of Technology, USA
Short Talk: Predicting Phenotypic Diversity in Developmental Patterning

9:20—9:40 AM
Coffee Break

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
11:00 AM—1:00 PM
Poster Setup

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
1:00—10:00 PM
Poster Viewing

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
4:30—5:00 PM
Coffee Available

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
5:00—7:00 PM
Signaling Pathways and Gradients in Development and Regeneration

Ballroom 2-3
* Alexander F. Schier, Harvard University, USA

* Jeffrey D. Axelrod, Stanford University, USA
Control Circuitry for Establishing Epithelial Planar Cell Polarity

Suzanne Eaton, Max Planck Institute, Germany
Modeling the Balance of Forces Controlling Cell Packing Geometry in the drosophila Wing Epithelium

Michael Levin, Tufts University, USA
Bioelectrical Controls of Embryonic Patterning and Regeneration

Ching-Ling Ellen Lien, Saban Research Institute, Children's Hospital, USA
Short Talk: Global Gene Expression Analysis of Zebrafish Heart Regeneration

7:00—8:00 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
7:30—10:00 PM
Poster Session 1

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

7:00—8:00 AM
Breakfast

Golden Cliff
8:00—11:15 AM
Organogenesis and Development

Ballroom 2-3
Masatoshi Takeichi, RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology, Japan
Cadherin-Cytoskeletal Interactions to Regulate Tissue Organization

* Lilianna Solnica-Krezel, Vanderbilt University, USA
Regulation of Nodal Signaling by Six3 during Establishment of Early Brain Asymmetry in Zebrafish

Thomas A. Reh, University of Washington, USA
Eye Development, Diseases and Progress Towards Cell-Based Therapies

* Eric N. Olson, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, USA
Epigenetic Control of Heart Development and Disease

Jared S. Burlison, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, USA
Short Talk: Interdependent Activities of Pdx-1 and Ptf1a are Necessary for Pancreas Organogenesis

Roger R. Markwald, Medical University of South Carolina, USA
Short Talk: Periostin Promotes Embryonic Valvular Maturation Through Rho/PI 3-Kinase and TGFbeta3 – Application to Mesenchymal Stem Cells

9:20—9:40 AM
Coffee Break

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
11:15 AM—1:00 PM
Poster Setup

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
1:00—10:00 PM
Poster Viewing

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
2:30—4:30 PM
Workshop 1: Engineering Tools for Biological Research
To discuss engineered tissues as controllable models for fundamental research.

Ballroom 2-3
Andrey Rzhetsky, Columbia University, USA
Text-Mining and Mathematical Modeling for Rapid Generation of Computable Pathway Maps

* Yasuhiko Tabata, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Japan
Drug Delivery System of Signaling Molecules for Tissue Engineering

Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri, USA
Building Three-Dimensional Functional Living Structures by Bioprinting

* Monica A. Serban, University of Utah, USA
3-D Cell Culture and Tissue Engineering Applications of A Novel Semi-Synthetic Extracellular Matrix

Herman H. Vandenburgh, Brown University School of Medicine, USA
High Content Drug Discovery with Tissue Engineered Muscle

4:30—5:00 PM
Coffee Available

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
5:00—7:00 PM
Functional Tissue Engineering and Adult Biology

Ballroom 2-3
* Arnold I. Caplan, Case Western Reserve University, USA
Design Parameters for Functional Tissue Engineering: Recapitulating Development

* Farshid Guilak, Duke University Medical Center, USA
Design Parameters for Functional Tissue Engineering: Engineering Principles

Frederick J. Schoen, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, USA
Functional Heart Valve Tissue Engineering: Learning from Development, Physiology and Pathology

Dan Gazit, Hebrew University, Cedars Sinai Medical Center, USA
Short Talk: Genetically Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Platform for Spine Tissue Engineering

7:00—8:00 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
7:30—10:00 PM
Poster Session 2

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch

SUNDAY, APRIL 15

7:00—8:00 AM
Breakfast

Golden Cliff
8:00—11:15 AM
Biophysical Regulation of Stem Cells

Ballroom 2-3
Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USA
Matrix Scaffold and Adult Stem Cell Differentiation

* Donald E. Ingber, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard, USA
Mechanobiology and Developmental Control

* Christopher S. Chen, Boston University, USA
Stem Cell Differentiation: Mechanical Forces, RhoA, and Adhesion Signaling

Buddy D. Ratner, University of Washington, USA
Modulation of Cell Responses by Biomaterial Chemistry and Architecture

Dennis E. Discher, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Short Talk: Matrix Elasticity Directs Stem Cell Differentiation

Matthias Chiquet, University of Bern, Switzerland
Short Talk: Defective Mechanotransduction in Integrin-Linked Kinase Deficient Fibroblasts

9:20—9:40 AM
Coffee Break

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
11:15 AM—1:00 PM
Poster Setup

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
1:00—10:00 PM
Poster Viewing

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
4:30—5:00 PM
Coffee Available

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
5:00—7:00 PM
Engineering Complex Tissues: Vascularization, Gradients, Interfaces

Ballroom 2-3
* Jeremy J. Mao, Columbia University, USA

* David J. Mooney, Harvard University, USA
Temporal and Spatial Regulation of Growth Factor Availability

David L. Kaplan, Tufts University, USA
Protein Scaffold Designs to Direct Cell & Tissue Outcomes

Gordana V. Vunjak-Novakovic, Columbia University, USA
Engineering Vascularized Cardiac Tissue

Shulamit Levenberg, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Short Talk: Co-Culture Systems for Vascularization of Engineered Tissues

7:00—8:00 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch
7:30—10:00 PM
Poster Session 3

Superior/Superior Lobby/Maybird/Wasatch

MONDAY, APRIL 16

7:00—8:00 AM
Breakfast

Golden Cliff
8:00—11:15 AM
Embryonic Stem Cells: Implantation, Research Models

Ballroom 3
* Gordana V. Vunjak-Novakovic, Columbia University, USA

* Gordon M. Keller, University Health Network, MaRS Centre, Canada
Commitment of ES Cells to the Hematopoietic and Cardiovascular Lineages

Peter W. Zandstra, University of British Columbia, Canada
Temporal and Spatial Control of Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal

Alan Colman, ES Cell International and A*STAR Center for Molecular Medicine, Singapore
Directed Differentiation, Evaluation, and Transplantation of Cardiomyocytes Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Robert Lanza, Astellas Pharma Inc., USA
SCNT and Autologous Strategies in Tissue Engineering

Sharon Gerecht-Nir, , USA
Short Talk: Engineering Human Embryonic Stem Cell Microenvironments

Shyni Varghese, Johns Hopkins University, USA
Short Talk: Engineering Musculoskeletal Tissues with Human Embryonic Germ Cell Derivatives

9:20—9:40 AM
Coffee Break

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
2:30—4:30 PM
Workshop 2: The Future of Tissue Engineering and How to Get There
The aim of the Workshop is to formulate a “plan of action” for translating the technological achievements of tissue engineering, informed by the advances of cell and developmental biology, toward practical clinical applications. The focus will be on summarizing the preceding days of the Symposium, with particular emphasis on identifying critical short- and long-term objectives as well as the means to achieve them. The format will be a panel discussion with a sufficient Q&A time to elicit active participation from the audience. The panel will include several Symposium presenters whose research involves different organ systems, as well as the NIH Program and Review staff. The research panelists will present summaries and recommendations for each of the Unifying Themes of the Symposium, focusing on topics where biology and engineering can mutually benefit each other to fill the existing gaps of knowledge. The NIH staff presenters will discuss how NIH can help to generate/bridge interactions between biologists and engineers, particularly in an era of tight budgets. The co-chairs (Nadya Lumelsky and Rocky Tuan) will coordinate the presentations with the questions from the audience.

Ballroom 3
Gordon M. Keller, University Health Network, MaRS Centre, Canada
Engineering Stem Cells Behavior

* Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, USA
Engineering Tools for Regulation of Biological Responses

David J. Mooney, Harvard University, USA
Engineering Complex Tissues and Tissue Regeneration

Charles E. Murry, University of Washington, USA
Opportunities and Roadblocks for TE/RM-Based Therapies

Fei Wang, National Institutes of Health, USA
Areas of Interest in Bioengineering Research Partnerships

Audrey N. Kusiak-Kalehua, US Department of Veterans' Affairs, USA
Tissue Engineering at NINDS: Opportunities and Challenges

Jean D. Sipe, National Institutes of Health, USA
Review of TE/RM Grant Applications by the Center for Scientific Review at NIH

4:30—5:00 PM
Coffee Available

Ballroom Mezzanine and Lobby
5:00—7:00 PM
Engineered Tissues: Implantation, Research Models

Ballroom 3
* David L. Kaplan, Tufts University, USA

Laura E. Niklason, Yale University, USA
Engineering of Vascular Grafts: From Biology to Engineering and Back

Jeremy J. Mao, Columbia University, USA
Engineered Bone from Osteoprogenitor and Vascular Progenitor Cells

* Charles E. Murry, University of Washington, USA
Stem Cells and Cardiac Therapy

Peter I. Lelkes, Temple University, USA
Short Talk: Generation of Vascularized Distal Pulmonary Tissue Constructs in vitro and in vivo

7:00—8:00 PM
Social Hour with Lite Bites

Ballroom 1-2
8:00—11:00 PM
Entertainment

Ballroom 1-2

TUESDAY, APRIL 17

 
Departure


*Session Chair †Invited, not yet responded.



We gratefully acknowledge support for this conference from:


Directors' Fund


These generous unrestricted gifts allow our Directors to schedule meetings in a wide variety of important areas, many of which are in the early stages of research.

Click here to view all of the donors who support the Directors' Fund.



We gratefully acknowledge the generous grant for this conference provided by:


National Institutes of Health

Grant No. 1R13EB007464-01




We gratefully acknowledge additional support for this conference from:

JDRF March of Dimes Foundation

We appreciate the organizations that provide Keystone Symposia with additional support, such as marketing and advertising:


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Special thanks to the following for their support of Keystone Symposia initiatives to increase participation at this meeting by scientists from underrepresented backgrounds:


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If your organization is interested in joining these entities in support of Keystone Symposia, please contact: Sarah Lavicka, Director of Corporate Relations, Email: sarahl@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-2690

Click here for more information on Industry Support and Recognition Opportunities.

If you are interested in becoming an advertising/marketing in-kind partner, please contact:
Nick Dua, Senior Director, Communications, Email: nickd@keystonesymposia.org,
Phone:+1 970-262-1179